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RBC First Office for Injury Prevention

Vision

An active life, injury free

    Mission

    Reducing intentional and unintentional injuries and injury-related death through collaboration, advocacy, research and education

    Intentional and unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death for people aged 1-44 years of age and truly are a silent epidemic in Canada.

    The RBC First Office for Injury Prevention, established in 1986 within Sunnybrook's Trauma, Emergency and Critical Care (TECC) Program, aims to prevent traumatic injuries and injury-related mortality across all ages through community education, collaboration, research and innovation.

    The RBC First Office for Injury Prevention provides community, provincial, national and international leadership in injury prevention. Our office delivers multiple programs and resources independently as well as with an extensive team of collaborators.

    Sunnybrook has been a pioneer in this area and in the development of a permanent office for injury prevention onsite.

    “Be Alert, Be Seen” provincial campaign

    Be Alert, Be Seen is a provincial safety campaign supported by The Office for Injury Prevention, in partnership with the Ontario Ministry of Transportation, Toronto Police Services, CAA, Ontario’s trauma centres and other road safety partners. The campaign runs throughout November 2016 and encourages both drivers and pedestrians to stay focused and remain visible while using the roads.

    Pedestrian Safety Campaign Questions and Answers

    1. Why launch a campaign on pedestrian safety?

    Pedestrians represent about one in five (19%) motor vehicle-related fatalities on Ontario roads. Between 2009 and 2013, there was an average of 104 pedestrians killed annually.

    2. Where do these collisions happen?

    Most pedestrian fatalities occur in major urban centres, such as Toronto. In 2013, 44 % of fatalities occurred at or within 200 metres of an intersection.

    As of October 20 this year, there have already been 35 pedestrian fatalities in Toronto.

    3. Who are the most vulnerable pedestrians on Ontario's roads?

    Seniors have statistically been the most vulnerable group of pedestrians.

    In Ontario 2013, seniors age 65 and up represent 45% of pedestrian fatalities.

    4. What is the theme of your campaign?

    "Be alert, Be Seen!"

    We encourage both drivers and pedestrians to pay attention and focus on the road, and to be visible when crossing the street.

    Walking can be dangerous if drivers and pedestrians don't follow traffic safety rules.

    5. What is the goal of the campaign?

    Change pedestrian and motorist behavior in order to reduce the incidence of pedestrian injuries and fatalities on Ontario's roadways.

    Educate motorists and pedestrians about their roles and responsibilities for safely sharing the road.

    6. Why do the campaign now?

    Pedestrian safety is important 365 days a year, but becomes a heightened concern as we head into the darker fall and winter seasons and adjust our clocks on November 6th for Daylight Savings Time. Research shows that the time change seems to have an impact on the number of pedestrians killed by vehicles.

    6. Why do the campaign now?

    Pedestrian safety is important 365 days a year, but becomes a heightened concern as we head into the darker fall and winter seasons and adjust our clocks on November 6th for Daylight Savings Time. Research shows that the time change seems to have an impact on the number of pedestrians killed by vehicles.

    A 2014 University of Colorado study indicated an increased risk of fatal crashes that persists for the first six days of Daylight Savings Time. The study cites an increase of 302 fatalities over a ten-year period in the U.S.

    A study by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh in 2007 found that pedestrians walking during the evening rush hour are nearly three times more likely to be struck and killed by cars in the weeks after the fall time change.

    7. Are you blaming pedestrians for being hit by vehicles? How about the motorists?

    Pedestrian safety is everybody's responsibility and so this campaign addresses both pedestrians and motorists.

    We want to remind pedestrians to be alert and visible to drivers.

    Obey signs and signals, cross at traffic lights, marked intersections and crosswalks. Also, we want to encourage them to wear reflective clothing or accessories especially at night.

    At the same time, we are urging motorists to always watch for pedestrians, especially when it's dark; yield to pedestrians at intersections, crosswalks, school crossings and crossovers.

    8. How can others support your campaign?

    We encourage people to show their support by tweeting the following hashtags: #BeAlert, #BeSeen, #StayVisible, #StaySafe, #WalkSafely

    Invite your friends to participate and engage in a conversation on this important issue. Post your pictures on Instagram or other social media platform showing you and your friends walking safely on the street and wearing reflective accessories or clothing.

    9. What else?

    Please watch our pedestrian safety video on YouTube.

    Invite your friends to participate and engage in a conversation on this important issue. Post your pictures on Instagram or other social media platform showing you and your friends walking safely on the street and wearing reflective accessories or clothing.

    10. What other information do you want the public to know?

    Increase awareness of legislative and regulatory amendments that took effect on January 1, 2016 regarding pedestrian safety requiring drivers to yield the whole roadway to pedestrians at school crossings and pedestrian crossovers.

    11. What is the penalty for not obeying this regulation?

    A fine of $150 plus three (3) demerit points. If in a community safety zone, the fine is $300 plus three (3) demerit points.

    12. Where can the public get more information?

    Connect with us:

    Facebook PageOunce of Prevention blog