Research  >  About SRI  >  Scientist Profiles
Share:  
|

Scientist profiles G-L

SRI Profiles

Laurence Klotz, MD, FRCS(C)

Affiliate Scientist

Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
2075 Bayview Ave., Room MG 204
Toronto, ON
M4N 3M5

Phone: 416-480-4673
Fax: 416-480-6121

Administrative Assistant: Susan Branscombe
Phone: 416-480-4673
Email: susan.branscombe@sunnybrook.ca

Clinical ProfileShow/hide details

Academic summary:
  • Undergraduate: University of Toronto, biology, 1971 to 1973
  • Medical training: University of Toronto, graduated 1977
  • Residency: University of Toronto, Gallie program in surgery, completed in 1983
  • Special Fellow in uro-oncology and tumour biology: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, New York, 1983-85
Appointments and affiliations:
  • Chief, division of urology, Sunnybrook
  • Professor, department of surgery, University of Toronto
  • Former Chair, Canadian Uro-Oncology Group and NCIC GU Site Group
  • Chair, Global GU Oncology Group
  • Treasurer, Society of Urologic Oncology
  • Chairman, World Uro Oncology Federation
  • Member, American Association of Genito Urinary Surgeons
  • President, Canadian Urology Association
  • Elected Honorary Member, American Urological Association

Research ProfileShow/hide details

Education:

  • MD, 1977, University of Toronto, Canada
  • FRCS(C), 1983

Appointments and Affiliations:

  • Affiliate scientist, biological sciences - Odette Cancer Research Program, Sunnybrook Research Institute
  • Editor-in-chief (founding), Canadian Journal of Urology
  • Editor-in-chief, (founding and current), Canadian Urology Association Journal (CUAJ)
  • Chairman (founding and current) Canadian Urology Research Consortium (CURC)
  • Chairman, Scientific Review Board, Prostate Cancer Research Foundation of Canada
  • President, Urologic Research Society

Research Foci:

  • Micronutrients
  • Prostate cancer prevention

Research Summary:

Prostate cancer, the most common human internal malignancy and the second most common cause of death in men, is likely highly preventable. The evidence for this is the 100 fold variation in incidence and mortality between races and regions, which is thought to be due, in part, to differences in dietary micronutrients. Dr. Klotz's laboratory has been studying the effect of selected micronutrients—particularly vitamin E, selenium and lycopene—in the prevention of prostate cancer. In a preclinical model, which spontaneously develops prostate cancer by eight months of age, his team has demonstrated that supplementing food with these micronutrients results in a dramatic and profound reduction in the development of these cancers. The major thrust of Dr. Klotz's research is to analyze the mechanisms by which these cancers are prevented.

His team analyzes the effect of these antioxidants on gene expression and molecules, which regulate cell growth. They are also interested in the relationship between the androgen receptor (a critical component of prostate cancer biology) and the response to micronutrients.

These studies will provide a scientific basis for the use of chemoprevention agents in prostate cancer. They will also provide some insight into the interaction between these agents. The studies will provide evidence as to whether patients with pre-neoplastic lesions of the prostate (i.e., PIN) benefit from micronutrients. This will have direct implications for men interested in preventing prostate cancer, and will provide a theoretical basis for optimizing the timing of initiation of preventive agents.

Selected Publications:

See current publications list at PubMed.

Related News and Stories: