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Your Whipple Surgery
Hospital  >  Care Programs  >  Odette Cancer Program  >  Gastrointestinal cancer care  >  Your Whipple surgery  >  What is a Whipple procedure?
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What is a Whipple procedure?

A Whipple procedure is an operation to take out a part of the pancreas, bile duct, and duodenum.

The Whipple procedure is used to treat tumours and other problems found in the:

  • Pancreas (a soft gland found behind the stomach)
  • Ampulla of Vater (a tube that joins the pancreatic and common bile ducts)
  • Duodenum (the first part of the small intestine)
  • Bile duct (a duct that sends bile to the small intestine)

This operation takes out the head of the pancreas, the duodenum (small intestine just below the stomach), the common bile duct, the gallbladder, and sometimes part of the stomach. This is called the resection.

After these parts are taken out the surgeon reconnects the end of the stomach, bile duct, and the rest of the pancreas. This is called the reconstruction.

After resection

After resection

After reconstruction

After reconstruction


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