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Reducing your dietary fat intake

How much fat is in foods?

Non-packaged foods (meat, poultry, fish, vegetables): You can look up the fat content of specific foods in the Canadian Nutrient File database, available on the Health Canada website.

Packaged foods (baked goods, dairy products, and prepared foods): Look for the Nutrition Facts table to find the number of grams of fat in each serving of a food.

How do you limit saturated fat?

Since most foods that contain fat contain both kinds, it is hard to target saturated fats alone. Lowering your total fat intake will reduce your saturated and trans fat intakes.

How can you eat less fat?

  • Fill 3⁄4 of your plate with vegetables, fruits, and whole grains to leave less room for higher fat foods.
  • Read food labels and eat fewer foods made with hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils or tropical oils (sources of trans and saturated fats).
  • Replace high fat foods with low or no fat foods:
    • Beans, lentils, and tofu are great lower- fat alternatives to meat.
    • Use dairy products with 1% fat or less.
    • Try low-fat versions of your favourite foods (yogurt, cheese, mayonnaise, salad dressings, margarine, crackers, snacks).
    • Packaged foods (baked goods, dairy products, and prepared foods): Look for the Nutrition Facts table to find the number of grams of fat in each serving of a food.Try low-fat cooking methods

Low-fat cooking methods

  • Broil: Cook fish, meat and poultry under direct heat. Let fat drain away.
  • Braise: Tightly cover and cook meat in a small amount of liquid at low heat.
  • Grill: Grill foods on medium heat to avoid charring. Fat will drain away.
  • Poach: Simmer fish, eggs or chicken in a flavored liquid or water.
  • Steam: Use a small amount of water to steam fish, poultry and vegetables.
  • Stir-fry: Cut meat and vegetables into thin strips, lightly oil pan, cook over high heat, stir constantly.